Reviews for Alphasaurs and other prehistoric types

Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

X marks the spot for Xenoposeidon. In this alpha-bestiary, the X denoting the only bone found for this long-necked dinosaur from which its entire structure has been extrapolated is cut into a flap that, when lifted, reveals Xenoposeidon's very, very long tail. This dinosaur, like the other 25 who walk, swim, fly, and prowl through these foldout pages, is made up of hundreds of the first letter of its name. Check out the red capital As that mark Allosaurus' fangs, or the vicious-looking Vs of the Velociraptor's claws, or the way the Ws of Wuerhosaurus form spikes on its dangerous tail. Each of the dinosaurs showcases a different typeface, too (all the typefaces are identified at the book's end). Meanwhile, fast facts about dinosaurs fill the margins. There is little doubt the strange art will reel them in and probably keep them reading. A wholly unique mix of typography and dinosaur science.--Fletcher, Connie Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

K-Gr 4-Each page is dedicated to a different dinosaur, from allosaurus to zuniceratops. On each one, readers will find the reptile's name, pronunciation, a wealth of fascinating facts (presented in a fun way with plenty of alliteration), and eye-catching illustrations. The text is delivered in short captions, but is chock-full of the kinds of facts and comparisons that will leave a lasting impression on young readers. Twenty-seven prehistoric lizards are covered-both those that are familiar and many lesser known, but equally fascinating. The illustrations were boldly created by typography. The featured dinosaurs are made up solely of an arrangement of their first letters, both capital and lower case. The many foldout pages are beautifully done and add to the overall appeal and excitement of the book. The font varies in style, size, and color, creating even more visual interest. Many libraries have alphabet books in abundance, but this is one not to miss.-Amy Shepherd, St. Anne's Episcopal School, Middleton, DE (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publishers Weekly
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In the third book in the series that began with 2009's Alphabeasties, Werner and Forss roll back the clock a few million years to offer a spectacular alphabetical examination of long-extinct prehistoric animals. As in Alphabeasties, the animals are constructed from first letters of their names: a triceratops, for instance, is formed from hundreds of capital and lowercase Ts. In addition to familiar dinos, the team features several species that readers aren't likely to know, including euoplocephalus and utahraptor (named for the state in which it was discovered). Die-cuts, flaps, phonetic spellings, and alphabetically oriented trivia ("Kentrosaurus was about the length of a kayak") are seamlessly integrated into the overall polished look of this standout introduction to both dinosaurs and good design. Ages 6-12. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.